Pots and Pans – Bring Them On

Remember the joy and sheer glee you felt as a toddler when Mom allowed you access to the cupboard with all those lovely, shiny and oh-so-noisy pots and pans? They gave you such a sense of freedom, from banging the pots, making uproarious sounds that were music to your ears to imitating Mom cooking, stirring and pouring your make-believe food from one container to another. You simply could not decide if you wanted to be a heavy metal musician or a chef from the Cordon Bleu. Such memories…

Thirty years later you have decided that cooking leaves much less of a headache than does a rock band. You have grown up to covet those magnificent pots and pans you see online or in a gourmet shop. Your time has come. Bring on the pots and pans! You can get additional information at Cooking pots ‘n’ pans .
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One of the first things to consider when building your pot and pan collection is to determine how extensive a collection you want. Do you want the bare minimum or do you wish to create your own culinary Christmas, with pots and pans on every conceivable surface of your kitchen? How much time you spend in the kitchen and the ease with which you would like to turn out your creations will also play a part in your considerations. Oh, yes – if you are not a Lottery winner you will need to carefully plan your budget. Sometimes it is better to spend more for fewer high-quality pieces rather than grabbing every piece of cookware in sight on the bargain table.

What will you need to start? Everyone, from novice to master chef, needs the basics. The basics include ROASTERS, SAUCE PANS, and SKILLETS.

Roasters include the ROASTING PAN and the ROASTING PAN with HIGH COVER. A standing roasting pan is rectangularly shaped with low sides. With the low sides, the heat from the oven envelops the meat, giving it full coverage. A very important accessory to the roaster is a rack which allows the meat to be suspended above its own juices and fatty drippings. Several different materials can be incorporated in the manufacture of the roaster: stainless steel, nonstick-surfaced aluminum, anodized aluminum, and granite.

What sets off a roasting pan with a high cover is its familiar oval shape with deep sides and a domed lid. Again, a rack is very useful. This type of roaster can be made from any of the above materials. Speaking of granite, do you remember the black or dark blue roasting pan, speckled with “freckles,” that your mother used every Thanksgiving to give that roasted turkey a golden glow? I can still remember the turkey aroma wafting itself throughout the house, teasing my nose!